Speakers

Yanty Wirza




Yanty Wirza


Yanty Wirza is an assistant professor at English Education Study Program, Universitas Pendidikan Indonesia. She got her PhD from Ohio State University in 2017. She has presented at numerous conferences in Asia and United States, won academic scholarships, and awards for her community services. Her research interests include L2 Identity, Literacy Education, TESOL, Teacher Education and Professional Development, and Qualitative Research. She is currently involved in several research projects on English teaching and English teacher education and professional development. Recently, she published an article on the Indonesian EFL learners’ identity which appeared in Indonesian Journal of Applied Linguistics vol. 8 (2018). Yanty Wirza Universitas Pendidikan Indonesia Jl. Setiabudi 229, Bandung, West Java, Indonesia yantywirza@upi.edu


ABSTRACT
Literacy Sponsorship, Language Ideologies, and Identity Formation of EFL Learners and Users

Literacy sponsorship is an important construct in explaining the ideological work of the literacy practices in a certain community. This study examined the multifaceted literacy sponsorship and ideologies and the pervasive roles they played in the Indonesian EFL learners and users’ identity formation. Using narrative inquiry, seven Indonesian graduate student participants’ narratives in learning and using English in local contexts and abroad were obtained through in-depth interviews to unpack the issues at hand. The study found that multiple sponsors and campaigns in EFL literacy practices ranging from the individual participants, institutions of various scales, to the multinational and international entities were involved serving certain purposes and ideologies. These literacy sponsors and the ideologies working in immediate and distant ambiances heavily influenced the participants\' literacy experiences in the ways that worked for or/and against the participants’ interests that shaped the participants’ identity. Moreover, it was found that the most prominent sponsors in participants’ EFL literacy experiences were the self, the Indonesian government with its apparatus, and the English hegemonic power. Thus, this study argues that whereas the concepts of literacy sponsorship have generally been portrayed as utterly positive, it could work in ideologically charged, nuanced, and paradoxical manners. Keywords: EFL, L2 identity, language ideology, literacy sponsorship, narrative inquiry